pesticides

  • Farmers and others using pesticides are being urged to use best practice when spraying, to protect the region's drinking water.

    Irish Water has confirmed that exceedances in pesticides are on the increase across Co Mayo, with exceedances detected during last year in the Westport public water supply, Newport, Louisburg and Kiltimagh water supply schemes.

    While there is no threat to public health, they say it's imperative that those using pesticides are mindful of best practice when spraying their lands, to protect drinking water quality.

    In Ireland, 82% of drinking water supplies come from surface water sources - such as rivers, lakes and streams - and such supplies are vulnerable to contamination from land and animal run-off.

    The herbicide MCPA - which is commonly used to kill rushes on wet land - is the main offender.

    A single drop of pesticide is enough the breach the drinking water limit in a small stream for up to 30 kilometres, which highlights the level of care needed to protect  drinking water sources.

  • Farmers and landowners are reminded to use best practice when spraying pesticides, to protect drinking water supplies.

    Irish Water says pesticides have been detected in drinking water supplies across Ireland, which sometimes exceed the permitted limit.

    Newport in Co Mayo is one of 6 areas of the country of particular concern, where pesticides are persistent.

    The Newport Public Water Supply, which sources its water from Newport River, is currently on the EPA's Remedial Action List, due to persistent exceedances for MCPA and Glyphosate over a 4-month period last year.

    Irish Water, working with a range of organisations involved in the National Pesticides and Drinking Water Action Group, says great care must be taken to protect drinking water supplies wherever pesticide use is considered necessary.

    While pesticides do not pose any immediate risk to health, Irish Water says a single drop of pesticide is enough to breach the drinking water limit in a small stream for up to 30 kilometres, which highlights the level of care needed to protect drinking water sources.

     

  • Farmers are being urged to follow guidelines when applying pesticides to their lands, following the detection of exceedances in pesticides in drinking water sources in Co Roscommon.

    Irish Water says the exceedances were noted in the Ballinlough / Loughglynn water supply in 2017 as well as low-level detection in other supplies, and while there is no threat to public health, they say it’s imperative that those using pesticides are mindful of best practise when spraying their lands.

    Ahead of the 2018 spraying season, Irish Water says five difference water supplies in Co Roscommon have seen the herbicide MCPA detected over the past 2 years – this substance is used mainly for eradicating rushes and is also found in other weed killer formulations.

    Roscommon County Council says careless storage, handling and improper application means MCPA ends up in drinking water, leading to breaches of drinking water regulations.

    A single drop of pesticide can breach the drinking water limit in a small stream for up to 30 kilometres.

    Roscommon County Council, Irish Water and the National Pesticides and Drinking Water Action Group are appealing to farmers and other users of pesticides to use best practice when spraying these substances.

     

     

  • People using weedkiller are being urged to be responsible, after an exceedance of the pesticide glyphosate was detected in the public drinking water supply in Newport.

    While the HSE says the levels do not represent a threat to public health, it's imperative that those using pesticides are mindful of best practice when spraying their lands.

    Glyphosate is a herbicide used mainly for controlling annual broadleaf weeds and grasses and is found in a number of weed killers.

    Irish Water is appealing to farmers and to those using pesticides to carefully follow the guidelines when applying these chemicals to their lands.

     

     

  • Six agencies have joined forces with Irish Water to try and resolve the ongoing problem with pesticide exceedances in the Newport public water supply.

    Glyphosate and MCPA have both been detected at levels higher than that allowed under EU and Irish regulations, and the EPA has put the Newport water supply on its Remedial Action List until the issue is resolved.

    While the HSE says the levels in the Newport water do not represent a threat to public health, Irish Water says it's un undesirable situation, and is urging those using pesticides to be mindful of best practise when spraying their lands.

    Irish Water, Teagasc, the National Federation of Group Water Scheme, Mayo County Council, the Local Authority Water Programme, the Department of Agriculture and the Animal & Plant Health Association have now come together, to try and find solutions to the problem.

    The group is reminding farmers, sporting organisations and professional users of pesticides to follow best practise in applying pesticides - particularly near lakes and rivers used as drinking water sources.