Mayo University Hospital

  • The number of Covid-19 patients being treated at Mayo University Hospital has reduced significantly - with a 30% drop over the past week.

    Latest HSE figures show 22 Covid patients being treated at the Castlebar hospital- down from 32 a week ago.

    There are 5 Covid patients currently being treated at UHG and 2 at Sligo University Hospital.

    Nationally, there are 366 people with Covid-19 being treated in public hospitals today - that's down 20% on this day last week.

    92 of these patients are in ICU.

  • Hospitals have reported a further reduction in the number of patients admitted with confirmed and suspected cases of Covid-19.

    There are now a total of 902 patients in hospitals with either confirmed or suspected coronavirus.

    The hospitals with the most confirmed cases are in Dublin, while Mayo University Hospital has 31 patients with confirmed Covid-19 and 14 suspected cases.

    The latest HSE figures also show there are 90 patients with the virus in intensive care units across the country, which is also reduction on recent days.

    Meanwhile, the testing criteria issued to GPs for Covid-19 has been broadened, so that patients no longer need to be in an at-risk group to be referred for a test.

    Patients need only to have a sudden onset of either a cough, fever, or shortness of breath, and no other cause that explains their illness, to be eligible for testing.

    They need to be referred by their GP for a test.

  • 571 patients are waiting on trolleys at hospitals across the country.

    University Hospital Limerick is the worst affected with 62 people awaiting beds, according to the INMO.

    That's followed by 44 at University Hospital Galway and 38 at Cork University Hospital.

    There are 32 patients on trolleys at Mayo University Hospital today, 23 at Sligo University Hospital and five patients on trolleys at Portiuncula Hospital in Ballinasloe.

  • There are 33 patients on trolleys at Mayo University Hospital today - up from 22 yesterday.

    The latest figures from the Irish Nurses & Midwives Organisation show 285 patients admitted to hospitals across the country are waiting for beds today - including 33 at Mayo University Hospital, 26 at Sligo University Hospital, 9 at Portiuncla in Ballinasloe and 5 on trolleys at University Hospital Galway.

    Meanwhile, Mayo University Hospital has today taken delivery of a long-awaited temporary modular unit, which will provide extra capacity this Winter.

    The unit arrived in several sections this morning, and was lifted on-site by a large crane.

    It's hoped the modular unit will be fully  operational by the end of November.

     

  • New figures show that the number of patients in hospitals confirmed as having Covid-19 has reduced.

    A new HSE report shows there are 770 confirmed cases in the county's hospitals, as well as 320 suspected cases that are waiting for their test results.

    The acute hospitals with the most confirmed cases are in Dublin.

    At Mayo University Hospital, there are 33 confirmed cases of Covid-19, according to the latest HSE figures published last night, with 10 suspected cases at the Castlebar Hospital.

    There are 14 patients with confirmed cases of coronavirus at Galway University Hospital with a further 11 suspected cases, and 8 confirmed cases at Sligo University Hospital with 26 suspected.

    The Minister for Health Simon Harris has asked people to "stay the course" for the next couple of weeks and do all they can to suppress the spread of Covid-19 .

  • There are 34 patients on trolleys today at Mayo University Hospital - the second highest number in the country, according to the INMO.

    Limerick is the busiest hospital nationally, with 53 patients on trolleys, while the number on trolleys has almost doubled since yesterday at Mayo University Hospital -rising from 18 to 34.

    There are 11 patients on trolleys at Sligo University Hospital and 8 at University Hospital Galway.

    Management at Mayo University Hospital has issued a statement, acknowledging that patients are experiencing long waiting times to be admitted from the Emergency Department to an acute bed, and apologising for the distress and inconvenience caused.

    They're assuring patients that they're working to discharge patients who are appropriate for moving home or to another facility, and are continuing to use beds at the Sacred Heart Hospital to accommodate some patients while refurbishment work is ongoing at MUH.

    Management have again appealed to the public to only attend the Emergency Department in cases of real emergency, and to wait in the ED alone, to help maintain social distancing.

     

     

     

  • There are 35 patients on trolleys waiting for admission to Mayo University Hospital today. That’s the third highest in the country, according to the INMO trolley watch figures, and the Mayo facility shares the ranking with University Hospital Galway today where another 35 patients are awaiting admission.

    Independent councillor Michael Kilcoyne , the Cathaoileach of Castlebar Municipal District, says Minister Harris should hang his head in shame in light of these figures, which he describes as “unbelievable” at the Castlebar hospital in light of the level of staffing there and the physical size of the facility.

    Speaking to Midwest News today he asks what our government TDs are doing about it – arguing that the people of Mayo deserve better.

    Councillor Kilcoyne is a member of the HSE West Forum, where he regularly, seeks an update on the long promised modular build / temporary extension promised for the Emergency Department at Mayo University Hospital, but to date it has secured no funding.

     

     

  • Trolley figures nationally have reached their highest point since the start of the pandemic, according to the latest figures from the INMO this afternoon.

    316 people are waiting without hospital beds across the country. This is the highest figure since the pandemic began in March 2020.

    The INMO has warned that overcrowding poses a COVID cross-infection risk for patients and staff alike.

    There are 36 patients on trolleys waiting for admission to Mayo University Hospital today, the third highest number in the country.

    Saolta issued a statement this morning stating that Mayo University Hospital is extremely busy today, which has resulted in pressure on bed availability in the hospital.

    The Castlebar hospital featured in today’s Irish Star newspaper as concerns were expressed about users of the ED, where patients had to wait in a tent at the entrance to the hospital to be seen by a doctor.

    The paper carries photos taken last Friday of people waiting in the tent, with the flap open to the elements on one of the coldest days in the year.

    Speaking to Midwest News today the Cathaoirleach of Castlebar Municipal District, Blackie Gavin says the situation at Mayo University Hospital at present is worrying and not acceptable.

    He is to raise the issue of the temporary structure and its purpose with the CEO of the Saolta group Tony Canavan at a meeting this afternoon. The fianna Fail councillor has called for the structure to be removed immediately.

    Midwest News contacted Saolta this morning and asked for a spokesperson on the overcrowding situation at the hospital at present, and we are awaiting a response.

    In a written statement Saolta says it regrets that patients are currently experiencing long waiting times to be admitted from the Emergency Department to an acute bed in the hospital.

    The public are reminded only to attend the Emergency Department (ED) only in the case of real emergencies. If your health problem is not an emergency you should contact your GP during normal surgery hours or the WestDoc GP Out of hours service, in the first instance.

    The Injury Unit in Roscommon University Hospital is also open 8am to 8pm 7 days a week, 365 days a year to treat adults and children.

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    489 people with Covid-19 are being treated in Irish hospitals today - that's down 1% on yesterday and down 17% since last Thursday.

    110 of these patients are in ICU.

    There are currently 37 Covid patients being treated at Mayo University Hospital - down one since yesterday, but it leaves the Mayo hospital still with the 4th highest number of Covid patients, after 3 Dublin hospitals.

    There are 12 Covid patients being treated at University Hospital Galway, 5 at Sligo hospital and 4 at Portiuncla in Ballinasloe .

     

  • 217 patients are being treated on trolleys at hospitals across the country.

     

    The worst affected facility is University Hospital Limerick, where there are 49 people awaiting beds.

     

    That's followed by 18 at Portiuncula Hospital, 16 at Mayo University Hospital and  3 at University Hospital Galway across the Midwest according to the INMO.

     

    There are no patients on trolleys at Sligo University Hospital this morning.

  • Mayo and Galway University Hospitals are among the most-overcrowded in the country today.

    Figures from the Irish Nurses & Midwives Organisation show there are almost 560 patients on trolleys at hospitals across the country - with University Hospital Limerick being the most overcrowded, where 60 patients are on trolleys, followed by 51 at Letterkenny Hospital.

    In 3rd place in the trolley watch are Mayo and Galway University Hospitals, both with 38 patients on trolleys today, according to the INMO.

     

  • Hospital emergency departments across the region are busy once again today, with 41 patients on trolleys at University Hospital Galway.

    The latest figures from the INMO show there are 18 patients on trolleys at Mayo University Hospital, 15 at Sligo University Hospital and 6 at Portiuncla in Ballinasloe.

    Again, the Saolta Hospital Group has issued a statement today advising the Mayo University Hospital continues to be extremely busy, due to limited bed availability.

    Hospital management have apologised to patients who are experiencing delays in the Emergency Department, saying they have very limited beds available throughout the hospital, and efforts are continuing to be made to identify patients who are appropriate for discharge.

     

     

  • There are 46 patients on trolleys today at Mayo University Hospital which is the second highest number in the country.

    That's according to the latest trolley watch from the INMO, which also shows there are 23 patients on trolleys at University Hospital Galway and 13 patients waiting for admission to a bed today at Sligo University Hospital.

    Nationally there are 373 patients on trolleys.

  • University Hospital Galway has the highest number of patients on trolleys in the country this afternoon – with 47 people waiting on a hospital bed.

    That’s the highest in the country, along with Cork University Hospital, where there are also 47 patients on trolleys.

    There are 480 patients on trolleys nationwide this afternoon – 23 of those at Sligo University Hospital, 7 at Mayo University Hospital and 6 at Portiuncula Hospital in Ballinasloe.

  • There are 48 patients on trolleys today at University Hospital Galway – the third highest figure in the country.

    According to the Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation there are 480 patients on trolleys nationwide – with 50 waiting for a bed in both Cork University Hospital and University Hospital Limerick.

    Elsewhere there 26 patients on trolleys at Mayo University Hospital, 29 at Sligo University Hospital and 5 at Portiuncula Hospital in Ballinasloe.

  • There are currently 51 patients with confirmed Covid-19 being treated at Mayo University Hospital.

    This is the third highest figure among Irish hospitals - after the Beaumont Hospital in Dublin and Cork University Hospital.

    Elsewhere in this region, there are 43 confirmed cases of the virus at Galway University Hospital, 12 at Sligo and 4 in Portiuncla Hospital, Ballinasloe.

     Latest figures from the HSE show that none of the 51 patients at Mayo University Hospital with the virus are being treated in Intensive Care.

    Nationally, there are 732 patients with the virus being treated in hospitals, with 65 patients in ICU - according to figures published at 8pm last night.

     

     

  • Galway University Hospital is once again the most overcrowded in the country, with 57 patients on trolleys today.

    According to the Irish Nurses & Midwives Organisation, the number on trolleys nationally has risen to 558.

    This includes 57 at UHG, 25 at Sligo University Hospital and 26 at Mayo University Hospital.

     Figures also show that, during the month of November, 178 patients spent time on trolleys at Mayo University Hospital, with an average waiting time of 12 hours on a trolley in the Emergency Department.

    The figures were confirmed to Castlebar Independent Councillor Michael Kilcoyne at a recent meeting of the HSE regional forum in Galway.

    Councillor Kilcoyne claims there are many Third World and developing countries that have a more satisfactory health service at present that what's being provided to sick people in Co Mayo....

  • 323 people are being treated for Covid-19 in Irish hospitals today.

    It's up from 315 yesterday, and is a 38 percent rise on the number of patients with the virus in hospitals last week.

    HSE figures show there are currently 8 patients with Covid-19 being treated at Mayo University Hospital, 12 at Galway University Hospital, 4 at Sligo University Hospital and one confirmed case at Portiuncla Hospital in Ballinasloe.

     

     

  • 85% of patients who took part in a survey have rated their experience at Mayo University Hospital as good or very good - which is higher than the national average.

    816 people who were discharged from Mayo University Hospital during the month of May were invited to take part in the National Patient Experience Survey, detailing their experience at the Castlebar hospital.

    54% or 440 people completed the survey - and of these, 81% were emergency admissions to hospital.

    60% said their overall experience at the hospital was very good, 25% rated their care as good, and 14% said the care given to them was fair to poor.

    The majority said they were treated with dignity and respect, and said they were involved in decisions about their care and treatment.

    However, the survey also shows three areas where improvement is needed.

    40% of respondents said they were not given enough time to discuss their care and treatment with a doctor. A number of patients said they were not told how they could expect to feel after an operation or procedure, and 30% said there should be better information on support services after discharge from hospital.

    In terms of the time patients are waiting in the Emergency Department, Mayo University Hospital performed better than the national average, but still below the HSE targets.

  • Mayo University Hospital is deferring all but very urgent inpatient, day surgery, diagnostics tests and outpatient appointments from this morning, Monday March 16th until further notice. This is to ensure that the hospital has the necessary capacity to deal with any increase in suspected and confirmed COVID 19 cases.

    Commenting a Spokesperson for the Saolta Group said, “A small number of urgent cancer and time critical procedures, appointments or tests will proceed and these patients will advised directly by the hospital. Patients are asked not to attend the hospital unless they have had confirmation from the hospital that their appointment is going ahead. We would also ask these patients not to bring anyone with them unless it is absolutely necessary and children are not permitted to attend with patients.

    “We regret the impact that these deferrals will have on our patients but they are necessary in order to deal with the impact of Coronavirus (COVID-19).”

    Visiting restriction continue across each of our hospitals in the Saolta Group. “We are again reminding the public not to visit any of our hospitals other than end of life situations and other exceptional circumstances as agreed with the ward manager in advance of visiting. To arrange a visit, families should telephone the hospital and request to speak to the relevant ward manager who will decide if a visit can be facilitated without compromising the welfare of the patients on the ward. It is particularly important that children do not visit patients in hospital.

     

     

    “We ask that members of the public help in the effort to slow the spread of COVID-19 by observing the visitor ban in our hospitals, by attending the Emergency Department at our hospitals only when necessary; by following relevant public health advice around hand hygiene, cough and sneeze etiquette and social distancing; and taking simple precautions to protect themselves, their loved ones and the wider community.”