Mayo University Hospital

  • The general public should be asking Fine Gael election candidates on the doorsteps what the Government is doing about delivering a larger Emergency Department at Mayo University Hospital.

    That's according to Castlebar Independent Councillor Michael Kilcoyne, who says the large numbers of patient recorded on trolleys each month at the Castlebar hospital highlight the lack of an adequate Emergency Department to cater for the numbers presenting.

    At this month's meeting of the HSE Regional Forum, Councillor Kilcoyne sought figures from HSE management as to the number of patients on trolleys at Mayo University Hospital in the first three months of this year, and claims the numbers recorded are not acceptable.

  • A Mayo Fianna Fail TD has expressed her concern that serious regulatory breaches and poor hygienic conditions were found at the adult mental health unit in Mayo University Hospital following an inspection by the Mental Health Commission.

    Deputy Lisa Chambers says she was alarmed to read the report which identified risks to patients at the hospital. She said it is of concern that there were not enough therapeutic programmes in place and staff shortages were limiting occupational therapy, psychology and social work services.

    A report published yesterday shows the acute adult mental health centre was compliant with 61% of regulations, rules and codes of practice - down from 74% compliance in 2017.

    Of the 14 areas of non-compliance, 4 were deemed critical - including staffing and individual care plans for residents.

    The report says the premises was not clean, and rooms were not well-ventilated, while the walls had chipped paint with cigarette burns in the carpets.

    Numerous ligature risks were identified, and not all staff were trained in fire safety, basic life support, and management of aggression or violence.

    The standard of individual care plans for residents was very poor, according to inspectors.

    22 areas of inspection were compliant, according to the report, with ten of these areas rated excellent.

    Deputy Chambers told Midwest News that she is concerned about the findings and will be raising the matter with the Minister for Health.

  • The first Dublin2Mayo charity tractor run set out from Dublin yesterday on a two-day trip across the country in aid of two charity causes – Our Lady’s Hospital for Sick Children, Crumlin and the special care baby unit at Mayo University Hospital.

    The run is passing through towns across the west today as it makes its way to Breaffy House Hotel, where it is expected at around 4pm.

    It will pass through Claremorris, Knock, Kiltimagh, Bohola and Ballyvaryr en route to Castlebar this afternoon and bucket collections will be taken in each town.

    There is also a night of entertainment planned for Breaffy House tonight.

    Communicare Healthcare in Claremorris is the main sponsor of the event and Managing Director Rosaleen Kelly told Midwest News that she is very proud of the efforts of those involved.

  • Five years after Mayo University Hospital was declared a smoke-free campus, compliance with the policy has started to reduce, with patients and visitors frequently smoking outside the main entrances of the hospital.

    Hospital management are now starting a renewed focus on keeping the area around the hospital, and the hospital grounds, smoke-free.

    Visitors, patients and staff are asked to refrain from smoking anywhere on the grounds of the hospital.

    New signage has been installed around the hospital entrances, asking people not to smoke and reminding them how important it is to keep the air around the hospital clean.

     

     

     

  • Due to an on-going outbreak of norovirus in Mayo University Hospital, management is now asking for a full restriction on visiting. Arrangements will be made for family members of critically ill patients or those patients who require assistance or support of a family member; this should be arranged through the nurse on duty in the ward prior to arrival at the hospital.

    Any patient presenting to the hospital with recent symptoms of diarrhoea and/ or vomiting or had contact with others who have these symptoms MUSTnotify staff on arrival into the hospital so that contingency measures can be immediately put in place.

    The Hospital Management says it appreciates and thanks the community for their support for this patient safety measure.

  • Gardai are seeking public assistance in locating a prisoner who escaped from custody after being brought to Mayo University Hospital for treatment on Saturday morning last.

    The prisoner remains at large this morning, after the Irish Prison Service confirmed the incident happened at around 10am on Saturday morning last.

    The man, who was on remand in Castlerea Prison on a burglary charge, escaped the hospital on foot.

    He is 34 years of age and is described as being of an “athletic build” with brown hair.

    Anyone with information on his whereabouts has been asked to contact Castlebar Garda Station on 094 90 22222 or any Garda station.

     

  • 27 patients had surgical procedures postponed earlier this month at Mayo University Hospital, due to a faulty water pump in the hospital's sterile services department.

    This also meant that surgical implements had to be sent to other hospitals in Galway and Sligo over the course of a week, as there was no water supply to the sterile service department at the Castlebar hospital -again due to the faulty water pump.

    The issue was raised at this week's meeting of the HSE Regional Forum, where Castlebar-based Independent Councillor Michael Kilcoyne questioned management on the impact of the incident, and how many patients had procedures cancelled or postponed as a result.

    Councillor Kilcoyne says there should be a back-up plan in place, for when such problems occur at a major hospital...

  • The Irish Prison Service has confirmed to Midwest News that a prisoner from Castlerea Prison, who was attending the emergency department of Mayo University Hospital yesterday, escaped from custody while at the hospital.

    A spokesperson for the Irish Prison Service told Midwest News this afternoon that they could confirm a male prisoner had escaped and that the Gardai have been notified and they are still actively seeking his return to custody.

  • Maintenance workers at Mayo University Hospital are undertaking a series of lunchtime protests, over changes in their contracts.

    Over the past number of weeks, the maintenance workers - who are members of SIPTU and Connect trade unions - have been protesting outside the hospital on their lunchbreak.

    They claim a number of changes are being made to their contracts of employment, without any negotiation with the HSE or hospital management.

  • It's understood about 20 women from across the country sought terminations yesterday, since abortion services became legal on 1st January.

    The MyOptions helpline, set up by the HSE as a referral path for women seeking an abortion, came into service yesterday and was said to be "busy but not overwhelmed" on its first day.

    Because of the 3-day cooling off period, it will be next week before the first terminations are carried out.

    Just 187 of the State's 3,500 GPs have signed up to provide abortion services up to 9 weeks of pregnancy.

    The list of GPs has not been published, as many fear being targeted by anti-abortion activists, but women who ring the freephone number will be given details of their nearest provider.

    There are currently nine hospitals in the State willing to provide terminations - including Mayo and Galway University Hospitals - at 9 to 12 weeks of pregnancy.

     

  • A Mayo surgeon was honoured at the 20th NUI Galway Annual Alumni Awards over the weekend.

    Dr Ronan Waldron, consultant surgeon at Mayo University Hospital received the alumni award for Medicine, Nursing & Health Sciences at the awards ceremony, which was held in NUI Galway on Saturday last.

     

  • The HSE and Department of Health are dragging their heels in relation to the proposed extension of the Emergency Department at Mayo University Hospital – that’s according to Mayo Fianna Fail TD Dara Calleary, who questioned the Health Minister on the issue yesterday.

    Last year, Minister Simon Harris announced that temporary modular units would be installed to relieve overcrowding at a number of hospitals, including Mayo University Hospital, but over a year later, the extra accommodation has not yet been put in place.

    In the meantime, Deputy Calleary says staff and patients are putting up with intolerable conditions at the Emergency Department in Castlebar, and he called for an urgent response from the Minister and from the HSE.

    Minister Harris said yesterday that the HSE Estates team had visited the hospital in Castlebar last week, and there will be further progress from there.

    Deputy Calleary says he will continue to pursue this matter with the Minister until work gets underway on installing the modular units, ahead of next Winter.

  • Mayo TD Lisa Chambers has expressed concern over low staffing levels in the Mayo University Hospital’s Maternity Ward.

     

    There are currently 10 fulltime staff vacancies at the maternity Ward and a 2014 government review found that the hospital was 5 staff below recommended levels.

     

    The Fianna Fáil TD has called on the Minster for Health and the HSE to address the staffing levels and wants five additional staff added to the ten that have already been approved.

  • Mayo University Hospital in Castlebar, University Hospital Sligo and Galway University Hospital are  among the 13 hospitals nationally  where women were not informed of a delay in their cervical cancer diagnosis

    The HSE confirmed yesterday that 162 women – including 17 who have died ,are caught up in the latest cancer screening controversy.

    A review conducted by the HSE confirmed 208 women should have received earlier intervention than they did but only 46 individuals were made aware of this.

    The examination, conducted by national director of quality assurance at the HSE Patrick Lynch, confirmed 17 of these women have died. The cause of their deaths is not known.

    Mr Lynch said he could not state if these women were informed of the delayed diagnosis before they died but insisted their next of kin would be contacted by today at the very latest.

    All of the other women affected would also be informed by today and given an appointment with a clinician free of charge.

    HSE director-general Tony O’Brien apologised to all of the women involved and to their families for the “completely unacceptable” practices.

    This morning the government is expected to ask the health watchdog HIQA today to investigate the scandal and the way it was handled by the HSE.

    Health Minister Simon Harris will also bring forward proposals to Cabinet today to make it mandatory for doctors to have to tell patients about things that may affect them.

  • Mayo University Hospital has apologised in the High Court for the standard of care provided to a woman who allegedly suffered a delay in the diagnosis of her lung cancer.

    Mother of five and grandmother Marie McDonnell from Castlebar died in January of this year.

    The Irish Independent reports that, in a letter read to the court, the hospital unreservedly apologised to her husband for the standard of care delivered  to her when she had an x-ray at the hospital in July 2017.

    General manager of the hospital Catherine Donohue said “This was not the standard of care that our hospital believed was appropriate,’.

    Before she died, Mrs McDonnell, along with her husband Anthony, of Riverdale Court, Knockthomas, Castlebar had sued the HSE over the care she received at Mayo University Hospital in 2017.

    Yesterday, Mr McDonnell settled the action against the HSE on confidential terms.

    The court heard that Mrs McDonnell had a chest x-ray on July 17,2017 with a repeat x-ray in six to eight weeks recommended.

    It was claimed there was an a failure to identify appearances on the x-ray which, it is claimed, were highly suspicious of bronchial carcinoma.

    It was further claimed there was a failure to identify a mass lesion present and a failure to refer Mrs McDonnell for a CT scan.

    Mrs McDonnell, it was further alleged, was not brought back for a repeat x-ray as recommended.

    When she had a chest x-ray 15 months later,in October 2018, a lesion was detected which had the appearance of an evolving bronchogenic carcinoma.

    It was claimed that Mrs McDonnell suffered a lost opportunity to be considered for feasibility of surgery.

    She also allegedly lost the opportunity to  have the suspicious lung mass evaluated in July 2017 and allegedly suffered a delay in diagnosis.

    The claims were denied.

    Mr Justice Kevin Cross approved the settlement.

     

  • The modular unit, which was promised two years ago to relieve overcrowding at Mayo University Hospital's Emergency Department, will still not be in place this Winter.

    The Health Minister announced the measure in 2016 to help tackle overcrowding, but it has now emerged that planning permission has not yet been sought for a modular unit at the Castlebar hospital.

    Fianna Fail Councillor Michael Loftus says it's a disgrace that, as we head into another Winter, the facility is not yet available.

    Councillor Loftus attempted to raise the matter at this week's meeting of the HSE Regional Forum, but told Midwest News he was unsuccessful in doing so.

    He says it's unfair on the people of Mayo that the promised modular unit has not yet been put in place.

  • You would get an appointment with the Pope faster than some patients are waiting to see a consultant at Mayo University Hospital. That the view of the Cathaoirleach of Castlebar Municipal District, Michael Kilcoyne.

    More than 3,000 patients are waiting more than a year to see a consultant at Mayo University Hospital at present.

    Cathaoirleach Kilcoyne is a member of the HSE West forum and he submitted a question to the forum this month on the waiting times for patients to see a consultant at MUH.

    He was informed by HSE management in response that more than 3,000 patients are waiting more than a year to see a consultant at Mayo University Hospital . While more than 750 patients are waiting more than three years for an appointment.

    The Independent councillor told Midwest News that he is continuously being contacted by patients or the relatives of patients frustrated at the length of time they are waiting in pain and discomfort to see a consultant.

     

     

  • Nearly half a million people missed hospital outpatient appointments last year, that's around 1,300 people a day.

    The HSE figures released to the Irish Times shows that almost 20 percent were related to STIs and 18 percent were psychiatry appointments.

    Nearly one fifth of patients failed to show up at Mayo University hospital last year, while St James's in Dublin had 17% no shows.

    It comes as the HSE struggles to cut waiting lists in hospitals around the country.

  • The need to establish a Pain Clinic service at Mayo University Hospital was highlighted in the Seanad this week.

    Currently, thousands of people across Co Mayo who suffer from chronic pain have to travel to hospitals in Galway or Sligo, and Mayo Fianna Fail Senator Keith Swanick is campaigning for a Pain Clinic at the Mayo University Hospital in Castlebar.

    Senator Swanick, who's a GP in Erris, raised the matter this week with the Junior Health Minister Jim Daly, and says he has agreed to liaise with the HSE West in relation to the matter.

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    No funding has been allocated for the modular unit, which was promised a year ago to extend the Emergency Department at Mayo University Hospital.

    That’s according to Crossmolina-based Fianna Fail Councillor Michael Loftus, who raised the matter at yesterday’s meeting of the HSE West Forum.

    Councillor Loftus says it’s not good enough for the people of Mayo that this modular extension was announced last Winter, but has not been provided.

    He claims it’s having a knock-on effect on district hospitals across the county, and says the modular build would only cost around €500,000.