Mayo University Hospital

  • There are 65 vacant posts at present in Mayo University Hospital, including 29 vacant nursing posts. These figures were confirmed to the Cathaoirleach of Castlebar Municipal District, Independent councillor Michael Kilcoyne by HSE management yesterday.

    The councillor had submitted a question on staffing vacancies at the Mayo hospital to the HSE West forum.

    Ann Cosgrove of the Saolta University Health Care Group said the total vacant posts currently at Mayo University Hospital  is 64.5 and almost half of the vacant posts are in nursing.

    Councillor Kilcoyne told Midwest News he believes its criminal not to provide front line hospital staff to patients in this region, and has again questioned why a promise by Minister Harris to offer all graduating nurses this year a temporary contract has not materialised.

  • There are 24 patients on trolleys waiting for a bed at Mayo University Hospital today. That’s according to the INMO trolley watch figures.

    It has been an extremely busy week at the Emergency Dept of the Castlebar hospital with trolley numbers in excess of twenty each day, rising to 36 on Tuesday last.

    Today’s figures are the third highest nationally.

    Across the country there are 220 patients waiting on trolleys.

    There are 17 patients on trolleys waiting for admission to Sligo University Hospital today and 15 patients on trolleys today at University Hospital Galway.

  • The overcrowding crisis continues at hospitals across the country this afternoon, with University Hospital Galway having the highest number of patients on trolleys.

    There are 51 patients on trolleys at University Hospital Galway this afternoon.

    Nationally there are 614 patients waiting on a trolley for a bed this afternoon.

    There are 34 patients on trolleys at Sligo University Hospital today, 13 at Mayo University Hospital and 7 at Portiuncla Hospital in Ballinasloe.

  • 664 people are on trolleys in hospitals across the country today.

    According to the INMO, the worst affected is Cork University Hospital where 63 people are waiting for beds. 

    It's followed by University Hospital Galway where 50 patients are on trolleys.

    There are 27 patients waiting on trolleys today at Sligo University Hospital.

    There are 15 patients waiting on trolleys at Mayo University Hospital and 4 at Portiuncula Hospital, Ballinasloe.

  • 419 patients are on trolleys in hospital across the country today. 

    According to the INMO, the worst affected is University Hospital Limerick with 58 people waiting for a bed. 

    It's followed by Cork University Hospital where 44 people are on trolleys.

    The third highest hospital with patients on trolleys is University Hospital Galway with 28.

    There are 20 patients on trolleys at Sligo University Hospital, nine at Mayo University Hospital and two patients on trolleys today at Portiuncula Hospital in Ballinasloe.

    Meanwhile, plans to start a ballot of nurses and midwives on a new contract were postponed yesterday.

    Officials at the INMO said the deal being proposed by the Government wasn’t one they could put to their members.

  • A report sought by the former Minister for Health Simon Harris from the HSE last June, into the management of Covid -19 at Mayo University Hospital has not been published, despite being completed.

    The Minister commissioned the report into concerns expressed by public representatives in Mayo over what appeared to be the considerably higher incidents of Covid 19 in the county compared to other Connaught counties.

    However, under a Freedom of Information request by Aontu, the content of the report have now come to light.

    Mayo Aontu representative, Paul lawless, who has secured the report, says it identifies numerous issues with the management of the virus in the hospital. He spoke to Midwest News today and said the report lists 'challenges at the outset' of the pandemic, including a 'lack of isolation facilities, Emergency Department risk due to overcrowding, no isolation, lack of negative pressure rooms and bed capacity'. The report also notes that the 'general infrastructure in part of the building is on the risk register'. 

    A further aspect of the report's findings is that the hospital and the district hospitals in Mayo were 'interdependent' and as such 'two way traffic between these sites' existed at the outset of the pandemic.

    The 7-page report then identifies a number of "issues that need to be addressed going forward", including the problem of the "physical infrastructure in Ballina and Belmullet district hospitals being substandard in terms of multiple occupancy rooms, layout and space".

    There was, according to the report, "an initial delay in testing (of about two weeks) which was extremely challenging for the hospital". The HSE added, within the report, that a proposal for a new fifty-bed ward block consisting of all single rooms is "being progressed as a proposal with Estates Colleagues". Finally, the report concluded by stressing that "in any future public health issue, clinical staff sharing accommodation needs to be reviewed at the outset".

    Paul Lawless claimed that the report confirmed many of the stories he had been hearing from patients and staff with concerns at the hospital.

    He concluded saying that he very much welcomes the recommendations of the report, specifically regarding the need for a new fifty-bed ward for MUH.

    “This report should have been published immediately upon completion. It is disappointing that it wasn’t published and that I had to resort to submitting a request under the Freedom of Information Act to get my hands on it. I would urge the government to see to it that the report’s recommendations are implemented as a matter of urgency”. 

     

  • Upgrade works are to begin next week on a number of wards at Mayo University Hospital.

    However, the works will mean the closure of up to 38 beds at the hospital to facilitate construction.

    Instead, hospital management are planning to use the acute ward at the Sacred Heart Hospital, also in Castlebar, as required.

     

    From next Monday 17th August, upgrade works will begin on the A Ward, B Ward and Paediatric Ward at Mayo University Hospital.

    The works involve replacing and upgrading windows, and replacing all the toilets and showers on the A & B Wards, and should be completed by the end of October.

    Hospital management has confirmed that up to 38 beds will be out of use to facilitate the construction works, and the hospital is planning to use the acute ward at the Sacred Heart Hospital as needed.

    The acute ward in the Sacred Heart Hospital will be under the clinical governance of Mayo University Hospital, with consultants and nursing staff from the hospital caring for patients there.

    General Manager Catherine Donohoe told Midwest News that the upgrade works are long-awaited, and they're happy the works are finally progressing.

    She acknowledged that there will be some noise and disruption during the works, and has apologised in advance to patients, their families and staff.

    She says every effort will be made to minimise the impact of the construction work on patients in the hospital.

     

  • Visiting restrictions are currently in place at Mayo University Hospital due to some patients displaying symptoms of diarrhoea and vomiting usually caused by Norovirus, commonly known as the winter vomiting bug. 

    Anyone with recent symptoms of diarrhoea and/ or vomiting or had contact with others who have these symptoms should not visit patients in the hospital to avoid spreading the virus. 

    Any individual who needs to attend the hospital as a patient either to the Emergency Department or AMAU should immediately advise staff that they have had symptoms so that staff can appropriately manage the situation. 

    The hospital says that, due to the possibility of the virus in A Ward & C Ward, visitors will be restricted in these areas. 

    Arrangements will be made for family members of critically ill patients on this ward to visit; this should be arranged through the nurse on duty in the ward prior to arrival at the hospital. Visiting to non-affected Wards will be strictly limited to visiting times as a precautionary measure.

    The regular hospital visiting times are between 2 and 4 pm, and between 6.30 and 8.30 pm in the evenings must be strictly adhered to.

    The Hospital management has put control measures in place to reduce the risk of the virus spreading to other areas/departments within the Hospital.   It is important that ill and vulnerable patients in the hospital do not become more ill than they already are. 

    The hospital appreciates and thanks the community for their support and cooperation in managing this situation. 

     

  • Visiting restrictions due to the 'Winter Vomiting Virus’ at Mayo University Hospital have been lifted. 

    However, hospital management  is advising that  there are signs that the 'Winter Vomiting Virus' is still active in the community and are asking visitors to help keep the virus out of the hospital.

    The public are asked not to visit patients if they themselves or members of their households are feeling unwell.

    Regular visiting Hours at Mayo University Hospital are from 2pm to 4pm and from 6.30pm to 8.30pm.

  • The visiting restrictions which were put in place at Mayo University Hospital on last Tuesday due to norovirus have now been lifted.

    However, members of the public are asked not to visit the hospital if they have been in contact with, or have had symptoms of vomiting or diarrhoea.

    Anyone accessing emergency care at the hospital who has had contact with or symptoms of vomiting or diarrhoea are asked to advise staff immediately on arrival. 

    Catherine Donohoe, General Manager of the hospital said, “The visiting restrictions were put in place to protect our patients and I would like to thank the community for their co-operation over the past week. I’m also asking for their on-going support to help prevent any further outbreaks by adhering to the visiting times, washing hands before and after visits or using the alcohol gel and to stay away if they have had symptoms or have been in contact with anyone with symptoms of diarrhoea or vomiting. I would also like to acknowledge the hard work by staff who were involved in managing the outbreak.”

  • Visiting restrictions have now been lifted at Mayo University Hospital.

    Hospital management say normal visiting has resumed in all parts of the hospital, except for one ward.

    The restrictions were put in place yesterday due to some patients displaying symptoms of Norovirus, the winter vomiting bug.

    While the restrictions have been lifted, hospital management are asking visitors to adhere to the set visiting times of 2-4pm and 6.30-8pm and to use the hand gels supplied as they enter and leave the hospital.

    Any visitors with recent symptoms of the vomiting bug are asked not to visit patients in the hospital.

     

     

  • Visiting restrictions have been put in place on C Ward at Mayo University Hospital following a number of suspected cases of Norovirus - the vomiting bug.

    To assist staff in curtailing the spread of the virus, hospital management says it's imperative that only essential visits take place at this time, and children should not visit the hospital as they may be particularly susceptible to the illness.

    Visitors are asked to comply with the restrictions, and to use the alcohol hand gels supplied as they enter and leave the hospital.

    Hospital management says there has been an increase in the number of cases of Norovirus in the community and anyone with recent symptoms of the vomiting bug should not visit patients in the hospital, to avoid spreading the virus.

     

  • Visiting restrictions remain in place at Mayo University Hospital due to some patients in B Ward displaying symptoms of diarrhoea and vomiting usually caused by Norovirus, commonly known as the winter vomiting bug.

    Anyone with recent symptoms of diarrhoea or vomiting or who has had contact with others who have these symptoms must not visit patients in the hospital to avoid spreading the virus.

    Arrangements will be made for family members of critically ill patients to visit; this should be arranged through the nurse in charge in the ward prior to arrival at the hospital. 

    In order to protect vulnerable patients please ensure that you use alcohol gel on your hands before visiting and when leaving your relative. 

    Visitors are advised to limit their movement throughout the hospital.

    Patients presenting to the hospital Emergency Department, Outpatients Department or Medical Assessment Unit must immediately advise staff if they have had symptoms of diarrhoea or vomiting or if a close family member is unwell with symptoms.

    The hospital management has put control measures in place to reduce the risk of the virus spreading to other areas/departments within the hospital.

  • While some restrictions are being eased from today, management at Mayo University Hospital say visiting is still not permitted at the hospital, other than in exceptional circumstances.

    The public are being urged not to visit patients, other than end of life situations and other exceptional circumstances which must be agreed with the ward manager before visiting.

    While appreciating how difficult it is for patients and their families not to be able to visit, management say it's a very important infection control measure which helps protect patients and staff.

     

  • A woman in a wheelchair has been a patient at Mayo University Hospital since the middle of March this year and is refusing to accept discharge, claiming that no home care package or medical plan has been provided for her.

    According to advocate for the patient, Mayo’s People Before Profit member Joe Daly, the hospital has told her she must vacate the hospital today or the gardai will be called.

    The woman in her 40s had been the carer of her father in his eighties, and claims she has no family members to care for her with limited mobility, and no adaptations carried out to her place of residence.

    Midwest News has contacted the Saolta Hospital group to ask for a comment on the situation and they have responded this afternoon to say the hospital cannot comment on any individual patient to ensure patient confidentiality is maintained.

    The Organisation say the discharge of a patient is a clinical decision made by the patients doctor in consultation with the patient and their family.

    Once a patient is considered appropriate for discharge the hospital makes all the necessary arrangements including follow-up appointments.