Lough Talt

  • A baby girl spent four nights in hospital after she was exposed to cryptosporidium according to this morning’s Irish Independent.

    A campaigner from the Lough Talt Water Warriors in Sligo, Kellie Cadman said she was given permission by the baby's family to highlight the case to ensure people in the catchment area are aware that it is crucial to continue to heed a boil-water notice.

    According to Irish Water, more than 12,500 of its customers in the towns of Tubbercurry and Ballymote, and in a large rural hinterland, continue to be affected by a boil-water notice which has been in place for 13 of the past 16 months.

    Ms Cadman said the 22-month-old baby was discharged on Sunday night from Sligo University Hospital but remains ill. She said there were other cases where people had become ill after being exposed to cryptosporidium.

    A spokesperson for Irish Water told said works on this essential upgrade can now be scheduled to commence in the coming months with a completion date expected in 2020.

    But campaigners say that in the interim a mobile treatment unit should be provided.

    Irish Water said it was a priority to deliver a solution that would enable the boil-water notice to be lifted as soon as possible.

  • Irish Water, working in partnership with Sligo County Council, would like to advise customers supplied by the Lough Talt Public Water Supply that the Boil Water Notice that was issued on the supply on Monday, February 5 will remain in place during the high risk cryptosporidium season which runs until the end of April/beginning of May.

    Following a meeting with the relevant stakeholders this afternoon (Friday), the HSE advised that the BWN should continue during this time. It was agreed that weekly sampling will continue until the end of April after which time all results will be reviewed collectively by all stakeholders and further actions will be advised by the HSE. The HSE has confirmed that to date there have been no cases of associated illness reported in the community.

    Out of 18 samples collected over the past few weeks, six have returned with exceedances for cryptosporidium.

    In the meantime, Irish Water will continue to engage with Sligo County Council to prepare a suitable planning application for submission which, if granted, will ensure the necessary barriers against cryptosporidium are installed at the Lough Talt Water Treatment Plant. Irish Water will be submitting a planning application to Sligo County Council to provide an emergency water treatment plant on the existing site towards the end of April

    Areas affected by the Boil Water Notice include the towns of Tubbercurry and Ballymote and a large rural hinterland including the villages of Annagh, Aclare, Bellaghy, Bunnanaddan, Curry, Lavagh, Ballanacarrow, Carroweden, Kilmacteige, Quarryfield and Coolaney.

    This boil notice also includes customers supplied by the Ogham Group Water Scheme (GWS) in Co Sligo and the following areas in Co Mayo: Cloontia, Doocastle, and the Moylough GWS.

     

  • The boil water notice on the Lough Talt public water supply has been  extended until further notice while the HSE continues to investigate illness in the community. That’s according to a statement today from Irish Water.

    The utility company says that working in partnership with Sligo County Council, it is advising customers supplied by the Lough Talt public water supply, that the boil water notice issued on the supply last February has been extended until further notice following a meeting with the HSE.


    The notice was issued due to detections of cryptosporidium in the water at the water treatment plant following routine compliance sampling. To date there have been 20 weeks of clear sampling on the scheme, however the HSE are investigating the cause of a number of cases of cryptosporidiosis in the water supply area during the period the Boil Water Notice has been in place.

    The HSE have indicated that the criteria for lifting this notice are zero detections of cryptosporidium in the water at the treatment plant together with a coinciding period of no reported illnesses in the community in the absence of a validated crypto barrier at the treatment plant.

    The next consultation to review this boil water notice between Irish Water, Sligo County Council and the HSE is scheduled for mid-September. In the meantime customers are urged to continue boiling water before consumption.

    Areas affected by the Boil Water Notice include the towns of Tubbercurry and Ballymote and a large rural hinterland including the villages of Annagh, Aclare, Bunnanaddan, Curry, Lavagh, Ballanacarrow, Carroweden, Kilmacteige, Quarryfield and Coolaney.

    This boil notice also includes customers supplied by the Ogham Group Water Scheme (GWS) in Co Sligo and the following areas in Co Mayo: Cloontia, Doocastle, and the Moylough GWS.

    Over 435 customers in Bellaghy are receiving clean, secure water from the Charlestown supply and no longer need to boil water before consumption

    Householders are reminded to continue to boil water before consumption including the washing of teeth, making of ice and in the preparation of food that is not cooked. It is imperative that people adhere to the boil water notice. 

     

  • A boil water notice for customers supplied by the Lough Talt Public Water Supply in Co Sligo and part of Co Mayo has been lifted after being in place for over eight months.

    The notice came into effect on 5th February, following the detection of cryptosporidium in the water supply, affecting some 13,000 customers in south and west Sligo as well as the area supplied by the Ogham Group Water Scheme in Co Mayo.

    The notice has now been lifted following a meeting yesterday between Irish Water, the HSE and Sligo County Council.

    The decision was made to lift the notice with immediate effect as there have been no reported cases of illness in the community and no detections of the cryptosporidium parasite recorded since the end of August. 

    However, Irish Water has warned that, until the Lough Talt water treatment plant is upgraded, there is a risk of further detections in the supply and it is possible a boil water notice will be re-imposed if there are more detections.

    A planning application lodged by Irish Water in 2015 for a new treatment plant at Lough Talt was refused for reasons of protected habitat at the lake.

    A new application was made in May of this year to upgrade the current plant, which Sligo County Council is currently considering.

  • Over 13,000 people are affected as a boil water notice has been reissued for the Lough Talt Regional Water Supply scheme, following the detection of cryptosporidium in the treated water coming from the plant.

    This affects the towns of Tubbercurry and Ballymote, and a large rural hinterland of south Sligo including the villages of Annagh, Aclare, Curry, Lavagh, Ballinacarrow, Carrowneden, Kilmacteigue and Coolaney.

    The boil water notice also affects customers supplied by the Ogham Group Water Scheme, as well as customers in the Cloontia, Doocastle and Quarryfield areas of Co Mayo.

    A boil notice was originally issued for the Lough Talt water supply last February, and wasn't lifted until October.

    However, the supply has been monitored closely by Irish Water since then, and following the recent detection of cryptospodidium and two cases of illness, a boil notice has again been issued for the Lough Talt water supply.

    Consumers are advised to boil water for drinking, preparing salads and uncooked foods, brushing teeth, and making ice.

     

     

  • Irish Water is reminding customers supplied by the Lough Talt Public Water supply scheme that the boil water notice remains in place until further notice.

    The boil alert was issued two weeks ago, following the detection of cryptosporidium in the treated water coming from the plant.

    A two-week testing and sampling programme is continuing, and once the results have been received and reviewed by all stakeholders involved, further action will be advised by the HSE.

    In the meantime, customers are reminded to continue boiling water before consumption, including the washing of teeth, making of ice and preparing food that’s not cooked.

    Areas affected by the boil water notice include the towns of Tubbercurry and Ballymote, as well as a number of Sligo villages and townlands, and the Mayo villages of Cloontia, Doocastle as well as for customers supplied by the Moylough Group Water Scheme in Mayo and the Ogham group water scheme in Co Sligo.

      

  •  

    Irish Water, working in partnership with Sligo County Council, would like to remind customers supplied by the Lough Talt Public Water Supply that the Boil Water Notice that was issued on the supply on Monday, February 5 remains in place until further notice.

     

    Sampling and testing was impacted this week due to the adverse weather conditions and will resume once conditions permit next week. As a result an update meeting that was due to take place today has been postponed until Friday, March 9. The results of the second set of samples will be reviewed collectively before further actions are advised by the HSE. The HSE has confirmed that to date there have been no cases of associated illness reported in the community.

     

    Commenting on the Boil Water Notice, Seamus Granahan, Regional Asset Operations Manager from Irish Water said: “We would like to remind customers to continue boiling their water before consumption. We would also like to stress that this is NOT a Do Not Use Notice. Once boiled and cooled the water is perfectly safe to consume.

     

    “Public health is our number one priority and it is imperative that people adhere to the boil water notice. Irish Water sincerely apologise for the inconvenience that this Boil Water Notice has caused and we will continue to communicate with local stakeholders and elected representatives to keep the community updated.”

     

    In the meantime Irish Water is urgently progressing with an alternative design proposal and will be in consultation with the relevant stakeholders regarding this detailed option over the next few weeks.

     

    The priority for Irish Water is to ultimately provide compliant and robust water treatment for the 13,000 people who are affected by this Boil Water Notice in the shortest possible time.

     

    Over the past couple of weeks Irish Water, in partnership with Sligo County Council, has completed a review of the catchment followed by protection works at the inlet.

     

    Areas affected by the Boil Water Notice include the towns of Tubbercurry and Ballymote and a large rural hinterland including the villages of Annagh, Aclare, Bellaghy, Bunnanaddan,Curry, Lavagh, Ballanacarrow, Carroweden, Kilmacteige, Quarryfield and Coolaney.

     

    This boil notice also includes customers supplied by the Ogham Group Water Scheme (GWS) in Co Sligo and the following areas in Co Mayo: Cloontia, Doocastle, and the Moylough GWS.

     

    Customers are reminded to continue to boil water before consumption including the washing of teeth, making of ice and in the preparation of food that is not cooked. It is imperative that people adhere to the boil water notice.

     

    A map of the scheme is available on the Irish Water and Sligo County Council’s websites.

     

    Irish Water and Sligo County Council sincerely apologise to all customers for any inconvenience caused by this Boil Water Notice.

     

    Water must be boiled for:

    • Drinking
    • Drinks made with water
    • Preparation of salads and similar foods, which are not cooked prior to eating
    • Brushing of teeth
    • Making of ice - discard ice cubes in fridges and freezers and filtered water in fridges. Make ice from cooled boiled water.

     

    What actions should be taken:

     

    • Use water prepared for drinking when preparing foods that will not be cooked (e.g. washing salads)
    • Water can be used for personal hygiene, bathing and flushing of toilets but not for brushing teeth or gargling
    • Boil water by bringing to a vigorous, rolling boil (e.g. with an automatic kettle) and allow to cool. Cover and store in a refrigerator or cold place. Water from the hot tap is not safe to drink. Domestic water filters will not render water safe to drink
    • Caution should be taken when bathing children to ensure that they do not swallow the bathing water
  • Irish Water is reminding customers that the boil water notice, issued on Monday for the Lough Talt Public Water supply scheme, remains in place until further notice, following the detection of cryptosporidium in the treated water.

    Irish Water has now confirmed that Charlestown has been removed from the boil alert, while the Moylough Group Water Scheme on the Mayo / Sligo border has been added.

    Areas affected include the towns of Tubbercurry and Ballymote, and a large rural hinterland including the villages of Annagh, Aclare, Bellaghy, Bunnanaddan, Curry, Lavagh, Ballinacarrow, Carroweden, Kilmacteige, Quarryfield and Coolaney.

    It also includes customer supplied by the Ogham Group Water scheme in Co Sligo, while Mayo areas affected include Cloontia, Doocastle and the Moylough Group Water Scheme.

    Customers are reminded to boil water before consumption, until further notice.

    A water sampling plan is starting today for a 2-week period, and the results will be reviewed before further action is advised by the HSE

    Irish Water is also increasing its scouring programme over the next few days which might cause some discolouration to water.

    Customers who experience discolouration should run the tap until the water runs clear.

  • Contractors have been appointed for the upgrade works on the Lough Talt water scheme in south Sligo, and work on the €10 million project is set to start in September.

    That's according to Sligo Fianna Fail TD Eamon Scanlon.

    Over 12,000 consumers are currently on a boil water notice, which has been in place for most of the last year and a half - affecting the towns of Tubbercurry and Ballymote and a number of villages and townlands in south Sligo, as well as Cloontia, Doocastle and Quarryfield in Co Mayo.

    A number of weeks ago, Sligo County Council granted planning permission to upgrade the water treatment plant at Lough Talt.

    Irish Water has now confirmed to Deputy Scanlon that contractors have been appointed for the project....

  • Householders and businesses in the Bellaghy /Curry area of east Mayo and South Sligo who had been taken off the Lough Talt Public Water supply earlier this year, when a Boil Water notice was applied to the scheme, due to the detection of cryptosporidium in the supply now want to get back onto the scheme as the Boil Water notice has been lifted.

    Local Fianna Fail deputy Eamon Scanlon says these people had been switched on to the Charlestown Public Water supply but are not satisfied with that supply and are asking to be switched back to the Lough Talt scheme.

    The deputy told Midwest News today that it has now been agreed that this will be done within the next few weeks.

  • 13,000 consumers supplied by the Lough Talt public water supply have been advised to continue to boil water before use, at least until the end of April.

    The boil water notice was issued on 5th February following the detection of cryptosporidium in the water, and Irish Water announced on Friday that, of 18 samples collected over the past few weeks, six of the samples have shown cryptosporidium.

     The areas affected include the towns of Tubbercurry and Ballymote and a number of villages in Sligo as well as Cloontia, Doocastle and the Moylough group water scheme in Mayo.

    Householders and businesses are urged to boil water before use until further notice.

    Irish Water is apologising for the inconvenience, and has confirmed today that businesses affected will get a 40% discount on their water in bill.

    In the meantime, a planning application is being prepared to install the necessary barriers against cryptosporidium at the Lough Talt water treatment plant.

    An Bord Plenala refused permission for the scheme in the past on environmental grounds.

    Sligo TD Eamon Scanlon says the public’s right to a clean water supply should be more important than protecting a species of snail, which has not been seen in the area in several years.

  • It has been confirmed this evening that the boil water notice for the Lough Talt Public Water Supply Scheme remains in place until further notice.

    A two-week testing and sampling programme which was implemented in agreement with the HSE has concluded and found two more positive detections for cryptosporidium.

    Irish Water met with the HSE today (Wednesday) and on the advice of the health authority the Boil Water Notice remains in place. A further two weeks of sampling and testing has been agreed and these results will be reviewed with the HSE on Friday, March 2. The HSE confirmed today that to date there have been no cases of associated illness reported in the community.

    In the meantime Irish Water is urgently progressing with an alternative design proposal and will be in consultation with the relevant stakeholders regarding this detailed option over the next few weeks.

    A statement from Irish Water this evening says its priority is The priority to ultimately provide compliant and robust water treatment for the 13,000 people who are affected by this Boil Water Notice in the shortest possible time.

    Over the past couple of weeks Irish Water, in partnership with Sligo County Council, has completed a review of the catchment followed by protection works at the inlet.

    Areas affected by the Boil Water Notice include the towns of Tubbercurry and Ballymote and a large rural hinterland including the villages of Annagh, Aclare, Bellaghy, Bunnanaddan, Curry, Lavagh, Ballanacarrow, Carroweden, Kilmacteige, Quarryfield and Coolaney.

    This boil notice also includes customers supplied by the Ogham Group Water Scheme (GWS) in Co Sligo and the following areas in Co Mayo: Cloontia, Doocastle, and the Moylough GWS.

    Customers are reminded to continue to boil water before consumption including the washing of teeth, making of ice and in the preparation of food that is not cooked. It is imperative that people adhere to the boil water notice.

    A map of the scheme is available on the Irish Water and Sligo County Council’s websites.

  • Cryptosporidium was detected in 25 public water supplies last year - up from 17 the previous year.

    However, the quality of drinking water in public supplies remains high - that's according to the EPA Drinking Water Quality in Public Supplies Report for 2018.

    The report says that, while the overall quality of water supplies remains high, it's important Irish Water ensures that water treatment plants are properly and effectively operated to protect public health.

    The Environmental Protection Agency says plants without appropriate treatment for cryptosporidium need to be prioritised for investment by Irish Water.

    During 2018, 44 boil water notices were in place - this is now down to 19 boil water notices affecting over 15,000 customers.

    The largest is the Lough Talt supply in Sligo, where over 12 and a half thousand customers are still boiling water before use.

    However, work is due to start shortly on the long-awaited upgrade works at the Lough Talt water treatment plant, and the €10 million project should take between 12 and 14 months to complete.

  • There's good news for almost 13,000 consumers served by the Lough Talt water supply in south Sligo and parts of Mayo.

    A boil notice has been in place on the water supply for most of the past year and a half, and is still in place.

    However, Sligo County Council management have confirmed that work will start in September or early October on the long-awaited upgrade works at the Lough Talt water treatment plant.

    Sligo FG Councillor Martin Connolly says the works will take between 12 and 14 months to complete, but should end the water difficulties for consumers in Tubbercurry, Ballymote and a number of other villages and townlands served by the Lough Talt supply....

  • Efforts  to preserve a rare snail species appear to have taken priority over the rights of 13,000 people  having a safe water supply from the Lough Talt, in county Sligo.

    That’s the view of local Independent cllr Margaret Gormley.

    The householders in South and West Sligo, and parts of East Mayo served by the supply have had  a boil water notice imposed , as a result of the discovery of cryptosporidium in the treated water coming from the Lough Talt plant.

    The boil water notice is in place in the towns of Tubbercurry and Ballymote, and the villages of Aclare, Curry, Charlestown, Lavagh, Ballanacarrow, Kilmacteigue and Coolaney as well as Cloontia/ Doocastle and Quarryfield in Mayo.

    Irish Water says public health is their number one priority, and it’s imperative that people adhere to it.

    Water must be boiled for drinking, preparing salads and similar uncooked foods, brushing teeth and making ice.

    Irish Water says it recognised in 2014 that the Lough Talt supply needed more advanced treatment to meet the risk of Cryptosporidium contamination and compliance with THM levels.

    However, Sligo County Council and An Bord Pleanala have both refused permission for reasons of protected habitat.