INMO

  • The number of people on hospital trolleys has hit 631 today - the highest figure recorded so far this year.

    University Hospital Limerick is again the most over-crowded with 55 patients waiting on a bed.

    That's followed by 50 patients on trolleys at Sligo University Hospital, according to the INMO.

    There are 37 patients waiting for a bed at University Hospital Galway and 15 at Mayo University Hospital.

     

     

  • Galway University Hospital is topping the INMO's daily trolley count today, with 52 patients waiting for a bed at the hospital.

    This is the highest figure nationally today, with 475 patients on trolleys at hospitals across the country.

    Sligo University Hospital has 30 patients waiting for a bed, with 14 at Mayo University Hospital and 3 at Portiuncla Hospital in Ballinasloe.

     

     

     

     

     

  • There's been another drop in the number of patients waiting on trolleys at hospitals across the country.

    520 people are without beds today, down from 621 yesterday, and a record high of 760 on Monday and Tuesday.

    University Hospital Limerick is the worst affected facility with 48 people on trolleys, followed by University Hospital Galway with 45 patients on trolleys.

    There are 21 on trolleys at Portiuncla Hospital in Ballinasloe, 19 in Sligo and 9 at Mayo University Hospital.

    Elective surgery is being cancelled at hospitals across the Saolta group this week as a result of the overcrowding, with the exception of a limited number of urgent cases.

    The INMO says there's still a dangerous number of patients without beds, but says any progress is welcome.

    The nursing union is calling for the HSE and Government to act on safe staffing, to ensure that this week's record high trolley numbers are never reached again.

  • There are 53 patients on trolleys at University Hospital Galway this afternoon, the second highest figure in the country.

    The highest number of patients on trolleys is at Cork University Hospital today, with the figure standing at 54.

    Nationally there are 511 patients on trolleys this afternoon.

    There are 30 patients on trolleys at Sligo University Hospital, 24 at Mayo University Hospital and none at Portiuncla Hospital in Ballinasloe.

  • Over 500 people are waiting on trolleys at hospitals across the country today.

    The INMO says 504 people are without beds, 66 of those are at University Hospital Limerick.

    That's followed by 55 at University Hospital Galway and 43 at University Hospital Waterford.

    Elsewhere, in this region there are eleven patients on trolleys at Sligo University Hospital, three patients at Portiuncula Hospital in Ballinasloe and two people waiting for admission to a bed today at Mayo University Hospital.

  • The number of patients on hospital trolleys across the country has increased significantly this week, compared to last week.

    Today, there are 565 patients waiting for a bed - with 583 on trolleys yesterday and 565 on Monday.

    Last week's trolley figures were between 300 and 400.

    The INMO figures show Galway University Hospital is the third most-overcrowded today with 44 patients on trolleys, while there are 22 waiting for a bed at Sligo University Hospital and 13 at Mayo University Hospital.

    The ongoing overcrowding and the pressure this is putting on nursing staff are among the reasons INMO members are taking strike action later this month.

    Nurses will go on a 24-hour strike on Wednesday 30th January - three weeks from today - with 5 further days of strike action planned for February.

    The union says members are fed up dealing with low pay and poor working conditions.

    However, the Irish Patients Association says patients lives are at risk if the proposed strike by nurses goes ahead at the end of the month.

  • There are 585 patients on trolleys in hospitals today, 129 fewer than the record high of 714 on Monday.

    In this region, there are 37 patients on trolleys at Galway University Hispital, 19 at Mayo University Hospital, 20 at Sligo Hospital and 16 at Portiuncla in Ballinasloe.

    This week’s surge in trolley figures has prompted the Health Minister Simon Harris to forego his St Patrick's Day trip abroad, saying it wouldn't be right to travel during a "difficult week".

    The Taoiseach says the government is working on improving the healthcare system.

    But Leo Varadkar says he won't be cutting his US trip short to come home and deal with the crisis:

  • There are 60 patients on trolleys today at University Hospital Galway which is the second highest in the country.

    That’s according to the latest trolley watch from the INMO which shows there are 531 waiting for admission to a bed nationally.

    Meanwhile, there are 31 patients on trolleys at Sligo University Hospital, twelve at Mayo University Hospital and nine patients on trolleys at Portiuncula Hospital in Ballinasloe.

  • The number of patients on trolleys at Irish hospitals today has reached 643.

    According to the Irish Nurses & Midwives Organisation, there are 27 patients waiting for admission to a bed at both Sligo and Galway University Hospitals, with 7 on trolleys at Mayo University Hospital and 18 at Portiuncla in Ballinasloe.

    Meanwhile, the Health Minister Simon Harris has said he will offer every student nurse and midwife a full-time, permanent job once they graduate.

    Minister Harris has tweeted to say that letter is on its way to each one of them.

    He posted that the HSE will need more and more front-line staff as they plan for more beds and facilities.

  • There are 649 people waiting on trolleys at hospitals across the country today, according to the latest trolley watch from the Irish Nurses & Midwives Organisation.

    Yesterday, levels reached a new record high of 714.

    Today, there are 28 patients on trolleys at Galway University Hospital, 21 in Sligo, 19 at Mayo University Hospital and 13 at Portiuncla in Ballinasloe.

    The worst affected is University Hospital Limerick where there are 58 people waiting for a hospital bed.

    The HSE has announced that non-urgent elective surgery is being cancelled at hospitals across the county, as they try and tackle the backlog of patients on trolleys.

    A spokesperson for the Saolta Hospital Group told Midwest News today that while non-urgent electives are cancelled at Mayo University Hospital, some urgent elective procedures are proceeding.

    The spokesperson said patients have been contacted directly in relation to their procedures.

    At Galway University Hospital , some non-urgent surgeries scheduled for today have been deferred.

    Affected patients are being contacted directly, so those who have not heard from their hospital should attend for their appointment as scheduled.

  • The Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation claims 2018 was the worst year on record for hospital overcrowding.

    Almost seven and a half thousand patients waited without a bed at Galway University last year, making it the third worst hospital affected nationally.

    New analysis from the INMO said in excess of 108,000 patients went without hospital beds last year - a record high.

    The figures are a 9% increase on 2017, which was itself a record high.

    This is nearly double the number in 2006 (55,720), when INMO records began.

    It blames overcrowding on low capacity and understaffing.

    The INMO said it has asked the Government to work with it to try to resolve problems with recruitment and retention in nursing.

    It says this has not happened, and that 95% of INMO nurses and midwives voted in favour of industrial action.

    The INMO executive will meet next week to set dates for strike action.

  • For the second day in a row, there are 760 patients on hospital trolleys across the country today - matching yesterday's record figure.

    According to the INMO, Limerick is the worst-hit hospital with 75 patients on trolleys, followed by Galway University Hospital where 51 patients are waiting for a bed today.

    Elsewhere across the region, there are 14 patients on trolleys at Mayo University Hospital, 20 in Sligo and 21 at Portiuncla Hospital in Ballinasloe.

    The Irish Nurses & Midwives Organisation says this extreme overcrowding presents a clear danger to both patients and staff, and requires immediate political intervention to stabilise our hospitals.

    The union has written to the Health Minister Simon Harris, calling for a major incident to be declared at the worst-affected hospitals.

    The INMO is also calling for the immediate approval of all nursing posts across the acute hospitals, an end to the recruitment ban, the cancellation of elective procedures in the worst-affected hospitals and the sourcing of additional beds in the private and voluntary sector.

       

  • University Hospital Galway was the third most-overcrowded in the country during last month, according to new figures from the INMO.

    During the month of February, 805 patients were treated on trolleys at the Galway hospital - with Limerick and Cork University Hospitals being the most overcrowded.

    The figures show over 10,000 admitted patients were left on trolleys across the country during February - an increase of 23% on February 2019.

    At Mayo University Hospital, 317 were on trolleys during last month - up from 171 in the same month last year.

    290 patients were treated on trolleys at Sligo University Hospital - which was down on the figure for Feb 2019 - while the figure at Portiuncla Hospital was much the same.

    The Irish Nurses & Midwives Organisation says the long-running trolley crisis has to be the top priority in talks on forming a new Government.

    The INMO says their members are forced to provide care in appalling conditions, while qualified healthcare staff are queueing ujp to work, but hospitals are unable to hire them.

    The union is calling for the recruitment embargo to be lifted - whatever the make up of the next Government.

     

  • September was the worst month of 2019 for trolley figures at Irish hospitals, with over 10,600 patients on trolleys across the country last month.

    It was also the worst September on record for overcrowding, according to the INMO.

    Figures released today show Galway University Hospital had the third-highest number of patients on trolleys, with 884 people on trolleys during the past month - the highest September figure at the Galway hospital in the past 15 years.

    University Hospital Limerick was the most overcrowded in the country last month, with over 1400 patients on trolleys.

    INMO General Secretary Phil Ní Sheaghda says the figures are astonishing, especially outside of Winter, and are placing a massive strain on frontline staff.

    The INMO says it's a capacity issue - more hospitals beds and more nurses are needed.

    Sligo University Hospital had almost 400 patients on trolleys during the past month, with 110 at Mayo University Hospital - which was down on previous years.

     

  • Nurses and midwives have voted to go on strike over staff shortages and pay.

    95% of members of the INMO voted in favour of industrial action. 

    The executive will meet on January 7th and 8th to discuss the result and set dates for their 24-hour work stoppages

     

  • Health services across the country will experience major disruption again this morning, as 37,000 nurses and midwives take to the picket line.

    A government offer of talks has been roundly rejected by their union, the INMO, as the discussions wouldn't address their pay claims.

    37,000 INMO nurses will walk off the job and onto the picket line for a second day from 8am over their dispute with the government on pay and staff shortages.

    A suggestion by Ministers Simon Harris and Paschal Donohue for talks on issues other than pay has been dismissed as "spin masquerading as substance" by the INMO. 

    Up to 50,000 people will be affected by the action.

    All outpatient appointments, surgeries and routine community nursing activities are cancelled.

    Local injury units, and nurse-led day centres for older people and those with disabilities are closed.

    The advice is to stay away from emergency departments. 

    The HSE's mental health services face disruption too, as the Psychiatric Nurses Association are extending an overtime ban tomorrow and Thursday in their own row over pay and working conditions.

    With unions and government entrenched in their views, it seems a breakthrough is a long way off.

    The Saolta University Health Care Group says today’s industrial action planned by the Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation will have a significant impact on patient services across all of their hospitals.

    The Saolta Group comprises of hospitals in this region including Mayo University Hospital.

    The industrial action is planned to take place at all public hospitals, healthcare facilities and community healthcare services from this morning 8am tomorrow morning.

    The Saolta Group say they are continuing to work with the INMO on arrangements for the day to ensure safe service provision; however scheduled services are cancelled.

    All Out Patient, Inpatient and Day Surgery appointments are cancelled and Roscommon University Hospital Injury Unit is also closed today.

    If a patient’s procedure is going ahead, the relevant hospital will be in contact directly with the patient to let them know.

     

  • A third day of talks aimed at averting the nurses' strike gets underway this afternoon.

    Members of the Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation are due to stage the first in a series of 24 hour strikes next Wednesday.

    They're calling for better pay to tackle recruitment and retention issues in the health service.

    The Workplace Relations Commission is to reconvene the talks at 2.30pm.

  • Burnout is now said to be commonplace in nursing and midwifery and unless pay is addressed the recruitment and retention crisis will get worse in our hospitals according to the INMO.

     The nurses union was before the Joint Oireachtas Committee on Health this week and outlined some disturbing statistics.

    They say that due to low pay it now takes an average of 6 months to recruit just one nurse.

    Some vacancies, even in the emergency departments of our acute hospitals remain unfilled and many nurses are not being replaced during maternity leave.

    Mayo Sinn Fein Senator Rose Conway Walsh is a member of the Joint Oireachtas Committee on Health and she has been telling Midwest News more about what the nursing union outlined as the working conditions for many hospital nurses.

  • Efforts to avert a strike by the country's nurses have ended without a resolution.

    Talks took place earlier between The Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation, the Psychiatric Nurses Association and the HSE, to try and reach agreement on issues surrounding pay and conditions.

    The unions say they weren't presented with concrete proposals and the strike action goes ahead.

    Another meeting between the sides is planned for next Monday.

    The INMO will hold the first of six nationwide 24-hour strikes on January 30th, while the PNA is planning a three day stoppage from February 12th.

  • The number of patients on trolleys at hospitals nationwide has dropped, after record numbers over the past two days.

    Latest figures from the INMO show 621 people are waiting for beds today, down from 760 for the past two days.

    University Hospital Limerick remains the worst affected facility with 63 people on trolleys, followed by 46 at University Hospital Galway.

    There are 20 patients on trolleys today at Sligo University Hospital, 15 at Portiuncla in Ballinasloe and 9 at Mayo University Hospital.

    The INMO says this is day three of a 'severe' period of overcrowding, and the intolerable pressure placed on frontline staff and patients continues.

    The nursing union has put forward a 5-point plan to alleviate pressure, and says all of the actions they're proposing could be taken today, or by the end of the week at the latest.

    Meanwhile, as pressure continues on hospital Emergency Departments, the Saolta hospital group has confirmed that elective procedures are cancelled at hospitals across the West & northwest region - with the exception of a limited number of urgent cases.