Fishermen

  • The father and son who rescued the two paddle boarders who were missing in Galway Bay overnight were given a hero’s welcome when they returned to the docks in the city this (THURS) afternoon.

    Patrick Oliver (38) and his 18-year old son Morgan were hailed for their role in saving the two females by correctly working out their location off the Aran Islands using tidal and weather information.

    And while the father and son team were being welcomed back to their home port in their seven-metre potting vessel Johnny O, just over a mile away the relieved families of cousins Sara Feeney (23) and Ellen Glynn (17) were overjoyed at Galway University Hospital as they greeted the arrival of the Irish Coastguard helicopter from Inis Oirr with the rescued paddle boarders on board.

    The families of the two rescued females, including Ellen’s dad Johnny Glynn, who captained Galway United to win the 1991 FAI Cup, hugged each other as the pair were taken from the helicopter and taken by ambulance on the short journey to the hospital to be checked out.

    Well-wishers greeted the two families as they made their way to the hospital while half an hour later another group lined the quayside to welcome home the father and son team, the latest in a long line of fishermen of the Oliver family from the Claddagh, who had made the remarkable rescue off the smallest of the Aran Islands shortly before noon.

    Patrick Oliver praised the cousins for ‘doing everything right’ to help them survive the night on the bay when the warm sunny evening gave way to a thunderous night of wind and rain.

    The identity of the missing pair became known during the morning with soccer clubs in the region raising the alarm after it emerged that one of the missing paddleboarders was a daughter of Johnny Glynn.

    Glynn is an iconic figure in Galway, having not only captained Galway United to their sole FAI Cup success in 1991 but he also scored the only goal of the match and since then has been involved in developing dozens of young players.

    Well-wishers rushed to greet him and the other family members at Galway University Hospital to rejoice in the rescue just as hope was beginning to fade.

     

     

  • A meeting organised by Clare Island Fishermen’s Group held earlier this month, heard a number of concerns that the group have in relation to the proposed laying of a fibre optic cable in Clew Bay, connecting the US with Europe.

    Aqua Comms have applied for a foreshore licence for the cable.

    It is proposed to lay the cable in a free floating unanchored way, on a 25-30km, stretch of seabed north of Clare Island and west of Achill.

    The Clare Island Fishermen’s Group say it is proposed to hold responsible any vessel which snags this cable, which they say effectively creates a serious hazard at sea.

    The group is also concerned about where the cable is due to make landfall – close to the harbour at Old Head. They say it would cause serious issues and danger for the passenger ferries at that location.

    They are also concerned about the impact on the future development of Old Head as a possible deep sea port.

    The group is holding another meeting this Saturday at 12 noon on Clare Island and all are welcome to attend.

    In a statement to Midwest News Aqua Comms say:

    There are over one million miles of subsea cable laid across the world. They are a simple and safe technology that facilitate our phone, TV and internet communications.

    There are currently 20 cables landing in Ireland and they do not represent either an obstruction or a hazard.  

    The concerns raised by Mr O’Malley are all perfectly understandable, but we are confident that we can address each and every one.

    • The narrow 4-centimetre wide cable will be buried two meters below the seabed. 

     

    • It has a reinforced protective steel coating, weighs 4 kg per metre and cannot float.

     

    • For a small portion of rocky outcrop the cable will be fixed firmly to the seabed, by virtue of its weight and the tension applied.

     

    • The cable is too heavy and strong to be lifted by a fishing boat but if damaged, it automatically switches off.

     

    All of these issues have been discussed at a number of meetings of the regional fisheries forum which were attended by representatives of the Clare Island Fishermens’ group.

    • Finally, we have had a positive engagement with the local ferry operator and from our engagement with the Council we are confident that the cable will not hamper any future development of Old Head.

     

  • Mayo County Council says it is fully supportive of a project which will involve the laying of a fibre optic cable in Clew Bay.

    The local authority’s Head of Marine Michael O’Boyle was speaking after concerns were voiced by the Clare Island Fishermen’s Group at a public meeting this month and also on Midwest News earlier this week.

    Their spokesperson George O’Malley said it is proposed to lay the cable in a free floating unanchored way, on a 25-30km, stretch of seabed north of Clare Island and west of Achill and it is proposed to hold responsible any vessel which snags this cable, which the group says effectively creates a serious hazard at sea.

    The group is also concerned about where the cable is due to make landfall – close to the harbour at Old Head. They say it would cause serious issues and danger for the passenger ferries at that location and are also concerned about the impact on the future development of Old Head as a possible deep sea port.

    In a statement to Midwest News in response yesterday, Aqua Comms, the company seeking the foreshore licence for the project said: there are over one million miles of subsea cable laid across the world and they are a simple and safe technology that facilitate our phone, TV and internet communications.

    There are currently 20 cables landing in Ireland and they do not represent either an obstruction or a hazard.  

    They said the concerns raised are all perfectly understandable, but they are confident that theycan address each and every one.

     

    • The narrow 4-centimetre wide cable will be buried two meters below the seabed. 

     

    • It has a reinforced protective steel coating, weighs 4 kg per metre and cannot float.

     

    • For a small portion of rocky outcrop the cable will be fixed firmly to the seabed, by virtue of its weight and the tension applied.

     

    • The cable is too heavy and strong to be lifted by a fishing boat but if damaged, it automatically switches off.

     

    They also say that they have had a positive engagement with the local ferry operator and from our engagement with the Council we are confident that the cable will not hamper any future development of Old Head.

    Michael O’Boyle has echoed those sentiments and said the council is very excited about the arrival of this second cable on our coastline. He says the technology is safe and is environmentally benign.

    He told Midwest News today that the local authority is extremely confident about the safety of this cable.